Getting people trained and interested in the solution

Posted on July 8, 2013

This is a recurrent discussion we have at Minerva when we talk about actual and past projects. We discuss the good experience we are having on actual projects and the ones we’ve had on past projects. Even if sometimes, some situations have been difficult and exhausting for us. We take all these as experiences and bring these info in our lessons’ learned list. With Aras Innovator we have the chance to be able to offer services for a very wide range of enterprise. We have subscribers from 5 users to 1,000. And the resources available can be very different from one customer to another. We realize that even in larger groups, a lack of general/technical interest on the solution can be a risk for the quality of the relationship during the project. The PLM is not another software of your environment, it’s a company-wide IT solution that needs to be understood at least for the following reasons:

to evaluate the solution

This is the key factor for us working with Aras Innovator. Aras is free to download, then save yourself long presentations, download the solution and install it. You’re not so into IT and you don’t know how to install it or don’t have the machine to do so? we’ll provide you with a trial access for free. The goal, is to understand the concepts of Aras. But then, when you go further into discovering Aras Innovator, you need to learn about the architecture and how deployments are made. This is key for you to trust or not the solution. Have you started a  requirement list with items like “the page should not take more than 8 sec to open”? If so, it means that you haven’t tried the solution.

to take decisions

Then, based on the experiences we’ve had on implementation and evolution, we realize that when the person we’re talking to is able to understand the business but also the technical concepts of Aras Innovator, he is more able to make alternative suggestions. He knows the user better then we do, he manages his budget, there are alternatives for which we would not have all the input to suggest these. If you want to be confident about your decisions, get trained or learn by yourself the solution.

to evaluate your supplier

The relationship with our customer is key. The best projects are not necessarily the biggest budgets. It’s mainly when there is a good quality in the relationship and good level of trust. And this level of trust is due to the fact that our customers know the solution and know how we are performing on the solution. We can clearly identify that when the company has no interest in understanding the solution, the relationship is not so good. And we have a clear split between fixed price project and time & material based projects. And honestly I think time & material projects are saving 15% to 20% of the project cost when they understand the solution. The price of the risk !

to extend the solution

If you know a little bit the business model of Aras, it’s a subscription based business model which basically means that the more solutions you build for your users, the most cost-effective your solution is. But how can you see where new solutions can be built in your organisation if you don’t know how the solution works. You need also to look at what other companies have been implementing, use the community to get more insights and more ideas.

A good document to start from:

Here is an interesting presentation I recently found. And I think it is a quite interesting view of elements companies’ IT people should know about Aras when they are involved in evaluating or implementing the solution


 

Yoann Maingon

Yoann Maingon is an Entrepreneur and a PLM enthousiast. He is our main blogger at Minerva as he has been publishing articles about General PLM concepts and Aras Innovator for more than three years.

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One Response to “Getting people trained and interested in the solution”

  1. Ed Lopategui says:

    Yoann,

    I totally agree that success is inexorably tied to open acceptance of the solution. The challenge lies in that solutions are largely pushed (top-down) onto a community – even if lead by one or more evangelizing champions diligently familiarizing themselves with the intricacies of the technology and how to apply them. I think the key to solving this problem is understanding how solutions can rather be pulled as we commonly see in the consumer space as individuals actively seek compelling technology. Dropbox is a great example of a compelling product that gets pulled into organizations. Once a technology is universally compelling, people are no longer apt to sit on the sidelines and rather openly embrace the technology of their own free will – and the problem of lack of familiarity fades quickly. Of course PLM is quite a bit more involved that Dropbox so the comparison is somewhat unfair, but you see where I am going – there is a balance to strike. The key is adding that compelling element without introducing chaos.

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